fashion-cd

angelclark:

99-Year-Old Lady Sews A Dress A Day For Children In Need 

Lillian Weber, a 99-year-old good Samaritan from Iowa, has spent the last few years sewing a dress a day for the Little Dresses For Africa charity, a Christian organization that distributes dresses to children in need in Africa and elsewhere.

Weber’s goal is to make 1,000 dresses by the time she turns 100 on May 6th. So far, she’s made more than 840. Though she says she could make two a day, she only makes one – but each single dress she makes per day is personalized with careful stitchwork. She hopes that each little girl who receives her dress can take pride in her new garment.

doctorinthebigbluebox
beasleypercussion:

montparnassty:

lesmisblog:

Just…
Did anybody notice the sign that reads “Beware pickpockets”?
It is like pure gold <3

Fun fact: pickpockets used to put up signs like that in tourist areas, so that tourists would pat places on themselves where their valuables were kept, to check that they were still there. Then the pickpockets would know exactly where to retrieve them from.

I love learning 

beasleypercussion:

montparnassty:

lesmisblog:

Just…

Did anybody notice the sign that reads “Beware pickpockets”?

It is like pure gold <3

Fun fact: pickpockets used to put up signs like that in tourist areas, so that tourists would pat places on themselves where their valuables were kept, to check that they were still there. Then the pickpockets would know exactly where to retrieve them from.

I love learning 

doctorinthebigbluebox

ebol4:

When I was at Tulane University, girls were warned about the “bad” fraternities: the ones that spiked the punch at parties with Everclear and maybe drugs, the kind of frats where girls got hurt. During my first week of class 18 years ago, rumours circulated about a girl on my floor who had been sexually assaulted by multiple men at a frat party. These issues were always discussed with a certain nonchalance – as if having at least one rapist around was an inevitable part of fraternity life.

Not much has changed.

University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee police are currently investigating a fraternityafter several women were found labeled with red and black X’s on their hands after they had to be hospitalized with memory lapses from intoxication at a fraternity party. Last year, three sexual assaults were reported at one Texas fraternity – within just one month. At Georgia Tech, a frat brother sent around an email guide called “Luring your rapebait”. Wesleyan had a frat that was nicknamed the “Rape Factory”. In 2010, fraternity brothers at Yale Universitymarched through campus yelling, “No means yes, yes means anal.”

These are not anomalies or bad apples: numerous studies have found that men who join fraternities are three times more likely to rape, that women in sororities are 74% more likely to experience rape than other college women, and that one in five women will be sexually assaulted in four years away at school. So it seems only natural to ask: With all of the current efforts, from the White House to college towns, to curb campus sexual assault – using “yes means yes” as a standard for consentholding administrators accountabletouting bystander intervention – why haven’t we addressed perhaps the most obvious solution?

It’s time to talk about banning fraternities.

maybe I’m just ignorant, but fraternities have always just seemed like a breeding ground for subhuman scumlords to me